Page 18 - Minnesota Vol 8 No 6
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Wake up. Check work phone. Put out work  res. Shower. Put on suit. Drive to court. Arrive at 7:45 AM. Present case. Leave courthouse. Drive to the o ce.
Plan for the morning. Respond to client. Respond to opposing counsel. Write updated court order. Email secretary. Respond to an- other opposing counsel. Respond to another client. Write portion of a brief. Buy lunch. Eat late lunch in o ce.
HAVE A
PLAN TO
AVOID
DO YOU
Make calls. Connect with colleagues. Prepare for deposition next day. Review deposition exhibits. Edit deposition outline. Respond to client. Respond to secretary. Leave o ce.
Commute for 45 minutes. Arrive home at 7:45 PM. Have late din- ner. Spend an hour with family. Check work emails. Fall asleep.
For many days, week, months, and years this is what my schedule looked like.
 e tasks varied from day-to-day, but the pressure and stress re- mained the same. My energy was o en depleted at the end of the day. Forget about trying to squeeze in exercise, especially if I had a trial coming up. I had to perform and as a result my well-being took the backseat. Aside from being exhausting, my schedule sometimes would impact my e cacy.
THE OCCUPATIONAL BURNOUT
phenomenon of “burnout.”
While many professionals have expe-
Unfortunately this type of schedule is very common among attor- neys. For some, the work day is even longer. As the workplace de- mands, pressures, and expectations continue to impact our lives, the
OCCUPATIONALWorld Health Organization (WHO) has taken a more serious examination of the
rienced burnout well before 2019, the BURNOUT? World Health Organization took the step of rede ning “burnout” and providing more detailed
BY FERNANDO FLORES
guidance on it – and actually recognizing it as a syndrome. To provide some context, if there is some injury, disease, or illness that we encounter in life it is recorded and coded by the WHO in the International Classi cation of Diseases (ICD). Basically, anything from our birth to our death that relates to
our health is included in the ICD.
In the 10th edition of the ICD, burn-out was brie y de ned as “a
state of vital exhaustion.”  at was it.
In May 2019 the WHO  nally made more powerful strides to in-
crease awareness related to occupational burnout. In the 11th edition of the ICD, the WHO coded a new de nition of burnout under “Prob- lems associated with employment or unemployment” under code number QD85 in Chapter 24 of the ICD.  is updated de nition pro- vides clearer guidance on how occupational burnout can be detected.
AS DEFINED IN THE ICD 11TH EDITION, BURNOUT:
“[I]s a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic work- place stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions:
feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
increased mental distance from one’s job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one’s job; and
reduced professional e cacy. Burn-out refers speci cally to phe- nomena in the occupational context and should not be applied to de- scribe experiences in other areas of life.”
As you can see from this de nition, occupational burnout stems from chronic workplace stress.
As attorneys chronic stress sometimes becomes part of our lives. But it doesn’t have to. With such high levels of chronic stress, it is no wonder that as a profession we abuse alcohol at rates that are 3-5 times higher than the general population. Almost 30% of us report strug-
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