Page 10 - Minnesota Vol 8 No 5
P. 10

CASE STUDY
Martie, who has worked for years as a registered nurse, knows more than the average person about health challeng- es – both physical and prac- tical. Diagnosed with breast cancer last fall, she is stoic
about the surgery and chemotherapy she has undergone in the past several months and opti- mistic about her full recovery. But, being told that nei- ther her own health insurance plan nor her husband’s plan would cover her hospital bills nearly derailed her faith in the health care sys- tem. She says she doesn’t know what she would do with- out the assistance of Cancer Legal Care and Bill Foley, the or- ganization’s health insurance advocate.
As her Explanation of Health Care Bene ts statements started to come in, Martie says she and her husband spent hours trying to under- stand what their options were and talking with their respec- tive human resources of ces. They went through the whole appeals process with their respective plans, but got no relief. At wit’s end, Martie con- tacted Cancer Legal Care and laid out the intricacies of her admittedly complicated coor- dination of bene ts situation. She says CLC’s response has been “stellar,” that Foley has stayed in close contact, via conference calls and email, as he works on her behalf.
“I can’t say enough good things about them,” she says.
CANCER LEGAL CARE:
WHAT LAWYERS SHOULD KNOW
BY JEANNE STEELE
LL TO R: JULIE OLMSTED, J. LINDSAY FLINT & LINDY YOKANOVICH
ast winter, an attorney contact- nancial fallout caused incredible stress ed Cancer Legal Care because for years and years a er she got better. he didn’t know where else to I thought there just had to be a better turn. Recently diagnosed with way.” Years later, a er earning her law
a potentially life-threatening malig- nancy, he said he was “more afraid of being broke and homeless than of dying from cancer.” CLC sta  attor- ney Julie Olmsted remembers that cli- ent—not because he was a lawyer but because his words underscored how gut-wrenching a cancer diagnosis can be, regardless of income, education or profession.
Lindy Yokanovich, founder and ex- ecutive director of Cancer Legal Care, learned  rsthand about the devastat- ing e ects of cancer when she was in high school and her mother was treated for colon cancer. Her family lost their health insurance coverage, but life-saving treatment continued thanks to the kindness of her mother’s physician, Yokanovich recalls. “But her ensuing un-insurability and the  -
degree and starting a family, Yokanov- ich set about creating it.
Launched in 2007, Cancer Legal Care is a one-of-a-kind hub for ad- dressing the legal and  nancial issues that keep too many cancer patients and their families awake at night. With a bare bones sta  of six—three attorneys, a health insurance advocate, paralegal, and an o ce manager— CLC has helped more than 9,100 Min- nesotans in 68 of the state’s 87 coun- ties with issues ranging from insur- ance appeals to employment issues to housing problems to estate planning. Regardless of cancer type or stage and where a referral comes from, CLC stands ready to help—for free.
CLC sta  address nearly 90 percent of client needs themselves, while ap- proximately 10 percent of cases are
ATTORNEY AT LAW MAGAZINE · MINNESOTA· VOL. 8 NO. 5 10


































































































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